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Fix the Flow: Cleaning Up Hard Water

Andover Bathtub Faucet Being CleanedHard water is a consistent alarm for renters across the country. It produces spots and crusty buildup that can look as though it is tricky to remove it. It restricts the flow of water through faucets and showerheads, starting issues with water pressure, amongst other things. Some tenants refuse to deal with it, which undeniably points to faucet damage and replacement. This is a costly choice and not one we’d approve. Cleaning hard water buildup off a sink faucet, inside and out, is not mind-boggling; nevertheless, it does require a fraction of your time. With the proper information and materials, it is likely to make the faucets in your Andover rental property operating as though it were brand-new.

Water that is high in calcium and other minerals, also commonly identified as hard water, can cause your sink faucets to look gross. Calcium buildup sometimes named as limescale can moreover prompt water flow issues. If you are experiencing water flow problems, the target of your concern is with the faucet aerator, found inside the fixture. A faucet aerator is a hollow metal cylinder that screws over the end of a faucet. Inside the aerator is a tiny screen, a rubber washer, a mixer disc, and perhaps a flow restrictor or an inner plastic housing. When these rudiments get filled with mineral deposits, the fixture will start having water pressure problems, possibly resulting in an uneven or erratic flow.

To clear these glitches, try cleaning your faucet’s aerator. Cleaning a blocked aerator is not a complicated process, but one that ought to be performed cautiously to circumvent the possibilities of damaging any of the many parts that are on the interior. Most aerators can be detached with your hand or a pair of pliers, allowing you to check the faucet spout for any deposits or blockages inside. After taking the aerator apart, simply soak the pieces in a bowl of white vinegar overnight. This will loosen the mineral buildup and let you rub off any debris. Re-assemble the aerator and replace it on the fixture, then check your water flow. You should see substantial improvement almost immediately.

Additionally, white vinegar is beneficial when cleaning hard water buildup on the exterior surfaces of a sink faucet, too. There is no need for expensive household cleaners if you practice the method recommended by the pros at Mr. Rooter. Their website has full guidance on how to clean hard water buildup on faucets, but the process is easy. Just soak some paper towels or strips of rags in white vinegar and wrap the base of the faucet with them. Fasten the rags to the faucet with rubber bands and let the vinegar sit for at least an hour, then scrub clean.

For an even unpretentious type of this practice, you can try the plastic bag method. To use this method, you need to fill a plastic sandwich bag with vinegar and tie it to the end of the faucet with a rubber band, ensuring that the end of the fixture is completely covered in the vinegar. Let the faucet soak for an hour or two, and at that point remove the bag and scrub it clean. Then, test your water flow: if the problem is still there, you’ll have to try cleaning the aerator as described above.

Are you contemplating about looking for another rental house? If so, make sure to look at our available property listings. We may have a property that works well for you. If you’re a property owner interested in our management services, contact us online or call us at 479-242-0791 now.

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